COVID-19: We are open as usual. Please click here for more information
  +44 (0)1473 255 789

Vaccinations and boosters

Vaccinating your pet for the first time

Puppy vaccinations or cat vaccinations prevent your pet from falling ill, providing immunity against infectious diseases that affect animals and humans.

The vaccines help your dog, cat or rabbit to build an immunity against these common illnesses and prevent unnecessary health problems.

Generally, the first stage of puppy vaccinations and kitten vaccinations, usually involving two vaccines, are given when your puppy is aged eight and ten weeks old and your kitten is aged nine and twelve weeks old.

Why not choose one of our special new puppy or kitten packages, which include all the vaccinations your new pet will need?

If you have any questions about cat, rabbit or puppy vaccinations cost, vaccination schedule, or when it’s safe for them to go outside, please get in touch. We can advise more about the illnesses covered by the pet vaccinations, but they would routinely be:

For dogs

  • Canine Parvovirus (Parvo)
  • Canine Distemper Virus
  • Canine Parainfluenza Virus
  • Infectious Canine Hepatitis
  • Leptospirosis

For cats

  • Feline viral infectious respiratory disease (cat flu)
  • Feline panleukopenia (Enteritis)
  • Leukaemia
  • Feline herpesvirus

For rabbits

  • Myxomatosis
  • Viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD)
Call now Register pet

Vaccine boosters

To ensure your pet maintains good health, you should follow our recommended vaccination booster schedule.

Vaccines have differing booster schedules, some are every year, others every three years, but it means you should book dog booster injections or cat injections every 12 months.

We’ll do our best to remind you when your vaccinations are due. Your visit is also a chance for our veterinary nurses to check over your animal to make sure it’s in good health generally.

If your dog is going to kennels, make sure it has a Kennel Cough booster at least three weeks before you go away. The booster (squirted up the nose, as opposed to an injection) will last a year.